Introducing Colin Snout. Rescue Me!


The chocolate brown eyes looked lovingly up at me from inside Manolo’s coat. ‘Oh you little darling’ I said, lifting the puppy from Manolo’s arms and taking the furry bundle into my own. ‘He is a gift for you and Pedro, a house warming present’. I looked at Manolo and smiled. It was very kind of him but I knew exactly what Irishman was going to say and, sure as eggs are eggs, the minute he came out of the house to see what all the fuss was about I heard the words ‘NO! ABSOLUTELY, CATEGORICALLY 100% NO!

colin

colin-snout-and-Pedro

‘But, please’ I begged, ‘Please Irishman?’ ‘He’s so sweet. You know if we don’t take him he will end up on the end of a chain somewhere, living outside like all the other dogs round here’ ‘Lottieness, we’ve got to be sensible, I know you love him but the house is in chaos, there’s rubble everywhere, the last thing we need is to be wading through puddles of puppy shit and pee and it’s not fair on him either. There’s enough madness already’ I knew that he was right; Now was not the time to be taking on the responsibility of a puppy. With a heavy heart I handed the tiny Podengo pup back to Manolo. ‘I’m so sorry Manolo, you are very kind but we really cannot take a puppy right now’ Manolo looked crestfallen as I handed the puppy back to him ‘I’ll have more puppies next year, you can have one then’ ‘Yes, maybe’ I said and then immediately regreted it.

love-love-me,-do!

beautiful-boy

We’d been living in the village for about a month when one day out walking we came across a very affectionate dog. He had the markings of a Jack Russell terrier but had longer legs, and sticky up ears. I made enquiries about him and found out that he belonged to the wife of a farmer down the road. I went and had a talk to her and she told me that he was a Rattonero Bodeguero Andaluz. I looked this breed up and sure enough they first bred in Jerez by an Englishman from Jack Russell stock. They were bred for the purpose of keeping mice and rats out of the wine cellars.

four-star-luxury-in-hotel

Irishman was still not sure that we were ready to take on a new pet but I was impatient. We’d agreed that whatever dog we got, it had to be a rescue dog. I registered on a site called Spanimal who in turn suggested that I should also join some groups involved with dog rescue on Facebook. It soon became clear that Spain has a lot of people working tirelessly finding homes and looking after the 1000’s of dogs that are abandoned or lost or strayed each year. I contacted a couple of people and began our search for a dog. There were so many beauties, so many that I longed to give a home to but we really liked the bodeguero type and I felt sure that somewhere out there, there must be one needing a home. I put a message out that I was looking for a Rattonero Bodeguero. Hardly a day had passed before I got word that there was a young male dog, fitting that description near Alicante.

colin-et-moi-uno

Two weeks later Colin Snout landed in our lives. Irishman was working the UK when I went to collect young Snout. Apparently, his callous owners had left him tied up in their garden with just some biscuits when they moved house. Fortunately someone found him and he was taken to a kennels where he was looked after and cared for. For over a year he waited patiently for a new home.

dog-cork-bum

Even though I fell in love with him at first sight, the first few days he was quite shy and very quiet. I was a little concerned as the days passed, that I may have just given a home to the world’s most boring dog. He didn’t bark, he didn’t play, he mostly slept and he only seemed totally relaxed and at ease when I took him to bed at night and slept with him in my arms (I’ve just read this post out to Irishman. He insists that I write that the short period when C.S slept in bed with me was when Irishman was away on business. There is no way that Irishman would ever entertain having a farting canine sleeping in our bed.)

And then one morning a miracle happened, he woke up and barked! Suddenly it was if we had a new dog! Colin Snout has now gone from strength to strength. He trusts us and loves us as we totally dote on him. He pretty much has us under his paw. He is incredibly bossy; if meals are running 10 minutes late or walks are postponed because of work or bad weather, he really makes sure to let us know that he’s not impressed. He stands by his bowl and then pushes it noisily with his paw or, he walks over to where his lead is hanging and then comes and nudges us as if to say ‘OY! Get off your fat butts and take me out!’ He is very good in the house and very clean considering that he’d been in kennels so long but around Christmas there was a spate of C.Snout leaving ‘Yule Logs’ around the house. Fortunately these days, C.Snouts ‘Yule Log’ production is mostly saved for outside.

on-the-beach

Although there are literally hundreds of dogs abandoned and dumped in Spain each year, a few of the dogs picked up are just lost and could easily be reunited with their owners if they have a microchip. There’s a big push to get dogs chipped here and it’s not expensive, it could also save a lot of heartache for both you and your dog.

There a many charities for dog and cat rescue in Spain but I am listing here the ones that I have dealt with personally.

Here is the Facebook page of the fantastic HOVAR where we were lucky enough to find Colin Snout.
https://www.facebook.com/hondonvar
Please contact them if you are able to foster or give a dog a new home, or recommend them to friends. Donations are always welcome!

http://www.spanimal.org/

http://www.hondonvar.com/page_2081590.html

And, if you are interested, here is something about C. Snouts breed
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratonero_Bodeguero_Andaluz

sun-worshipper

colin-snout

55 thoughts on “Introducing Colin Snout. Rescue Me!

  1. My poor university middle child bought a dog a couple of years ago instead of groceries. She did save the dog from most certainly a horrible life, but it also meant that hubby and I had another mouth to feed. Long story short, Bear is a wonderful dog, believes he is a lap dog even though he is very large. He has also helped middle child with her depression and panic attacks, so in the long run it was a good idea.

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    1. That is a happy story, and it’s great that your daughter gets so much comfort from Bear. I’ve often found that large dogs think they are smaller than they really are! I think they are quite envious of the lapdogs in some ways, being able to snuggle on to a warm soft lap. I’ve had rescue dogs before and apart from one disaster (she killed one of our dogs and a kitten) they have all been very loving and affectionate and given us great joy.

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  2. I noticed elsewhere on comments that you had acquired a ratonero. But you turned down a Podenco???!!!!! One of the commenters on Pippadogblog (where Snowy now writes too) said they were the best dogs ever. Certainly not to be described as boring. More like a Ritalin pup. Sometimes boring would be good.

    I soon discovered while I was stuck in Spain waiting for him to have his jabs and chip before I could bring him to Gib, that the best way to avoid puddles or ‘logs’ at night was to take him to bed with me. I am pleased to say he does not fart. Perhaps Colin doesn’t either? Needless to state he comes to bed with us in both Spain and Gib now. When he gets cold, he walks across my face and we hold up the sheets for him to crawl under so he can burrow down inside. I’d never have thought Partner would have agreed to that.

    If you scroll down the link – http://wp.me/p213PD-Gj – there is a multi vid of Snowy on the beach with Partner, looks pretty much like your pic of CS and the irishman on the beach. Spain is full of animal abuse stories sadly, and the shelters are full to overflowing. We weren’t specific about what we wanted so just let our vet know we would take in an unwanted dog, if one didn’t turn up on the street first (like Pippa did). Snowy was dumped in a contenador at a few days old.

    One of the dogs at the finca opposite to us looks like CS. I saw her clear an 8-10ft gate with ease. I hope your gates/walls/fences are high.

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    1. Oh, I never said that Podengo’s were boring! I meant that I was worried that C.Snout was boring when he first arrived, he didnt’ do much but of course he was traumatised after all that he had been through. It was said tongue in cheek and he is far from boring.
      I love the bodeguero’s, they are a lovely breed, sweet natured, good with children but not good with cats, well certainly not ours so bang goes having a cat which is something else that we wanted.

      Fortunately our courtyard is walled and there is no way that he can escape but he’s very wilful and on walks he has a tendency to pretend he can’t hear me when it’s time to go home, he’ll think nothing of shooting off into the olive groves until he’s ready to come home. He is very affectionate and we are thrilled to have him in our lives. I’m sure there will be a companion for him in the not too distant future! 😀

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      1. Sorry Lottie, I didn’t think you had said that. It was my unclear way of writing, ie it was meant to be a comparison, because the Little Rat (white with pink ears and nose etc because albino so looks like a rat) has never been boring from day 1, ie your dog was good and quiet and mine has always been a little pest. Currently trying to attack Pippa on the sofa.

        Snowy seems pretty good natured too. Wicked teeth though. He’s currently deciding to flex his muscles against the Gib monkeys who are currently down the town. So far I’ve stopped him barking at them, but there was a bit of a growl today at a young one. Cats he’s been ok with, again so far. But cats are irrelevant as Pippa is the Cat Chasing Monster from Hell.

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  3. I see the newest member of the family shows good taste in his choice of companion. This was a lovely story though I felt very sorry for Manolo and his dog.
    Somehow I seem to have missed all the work you did on the property during the waiting time. I want to know all the work has been done and that you’re both happy with your choice. You obviously seem happy with the village.
    xxx Sending Massive Hugs xxx

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    1. I know, David, I felt a real heel not taking the puppy but we really were in no position to do so. I hope that he has a nice new home. There are so many dogs here, most people have at least 3/4 and some of the farms keep 6 or more.

      You haven’t missed anything with the building work! This ‘dogs tail’ has been squeezed in as C.Snout arrived quite early on in our time here and I’m trying to keep the stories in some sort of chronological order. Have no fear, we are not at the end of the bucket saga yet 😉

      Massive Hugs to you as always, Lottie XXXXX

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  4. Yay! Finally I can sleep knowing what the dog looks like…even though it’s a different dog! Good for you for taking in a rescue. So many pets end up homeless these days. CS is a beauty and a lucky dog indeed.

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    1. Thanks, Beduwen. We’d talked about getting a dog when we were still living in Jakarta so i’d done a bit of research and knew that there were lots of rescue dogs in Spain that need homes. He is a sweetie but inclined to want to rule the roost, it’s amazing how bossy dogs can get if you let them! He’s got a lovely nature and we feel very lucky – he is the perfect dog for us 😀

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  5. What a dog-angel you are! I remember cringing many a time when I’d come across yelping dogs, chained up, with not a spot of food anywhere, jumping about in their excrement… it was dog-awful. So happy to hear that there are groups advocating for rescue dogs, and that you’ve joined their ranks. Yay Lottie 😉

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    1. I know, it’s very sad. My heart also sinks when I see them stuck all day every day on the end of a chain. Here is gets very cold, we’ve had snow twice and frosts, it’s a miserable life for them and i’m not sure what purpose they serve? Even if they are there to help guard the property, they still deserve a dry, warm place to sleep, fresh water and decent food and exercise. Not good at all – a miserable existence 😦

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  6. I think you might have a kind of ‘Milo’ there. He looks a very good and affectionate dog. Our Milo doesn’t sleep on a bed. He likes to wake me up and jumps against the mattress, something he wouldn’t dare to do on Helvi’s side.
    He mainly sleeps outside and stares at the possums that still leap from the roof into the trees. During the day he spends hours going through the bushes killing lizards. We don’t approve but it seems to be in their nature to protect owners from vermin including lizards. I can well imagine them doing a good job amongst the wine barrels killing rats and mice.
    Talking about wine, no doubt you have tried some. I am curious how the Spanish have taken to the screw cap. (Australian invention)
    Loved CS, you can see he has a loving noble nature. Give him our love.

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    1. I love your Milo 😀 He seems quite a character. I’m sure maybe there was something subliminal going on there when I feel in love with the bodegueros – Spains answer to Milo!

      We are on a very tight budget so I’ve not had any ‘decent’ wine since I’ve been here – any bottles we’ve bought have all had corks, the screw-top is not that common. For price comparison if you are interested, you can buy 5 litre boxes of the local red wine for 6 euros that is 9.27 Australian dollars. I’m not saying it’s good, its just about drinkable but it made lovely mulled wine over Christmas – toss in some cheap Spanish brandy, oranges studded with cloves, a few sticks of cinnamon and a modest amount of sugar, heat up and – yum!
      Maybe that why Colin made some yule logs of us, he wanted to join in the festive fun?

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  7. What a great addition. Lulu is definitely not allowed on the bed. CS looks like a star in the making. I can imagine the joy when he first barked. You need lots more CSs, Lottie. I’m sure Mr. Blahnik can help.

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    1. hehe! if i had my way, Mr C.S would be either on or in the bed every night. Apparently the Native American Indians refer to cold nights as ‘3 dog nights’ he certainly made a very lovely hot water bottle when he slept with me when Pete was away. Hopefully there will be another CS in a few months 😀

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  8. When I lived on the urbanizacion in Spain it was overrun by feral dogs. Mostly this was people who moved to Spain, got a dog and then 6 months later decided Spain wasn’t for them after all so went back to UK (or wherever) leaving dog behind to fend for itself.
    People amaze me.

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    1. I think this may be what happened to our dog. He didn’t understand English when he first arrived, only Spanish. I wondered why he didn’t know the commands ‘sit’ ‘lie’ ‘basket’ etc It wasn’t until our neighbour started talking to him that the penny bounced – he sat as soon as she commanded him! oh lols. He’s now bi-lingual, in fact i suspect that his english is better than our spanish. Fabulous, our dog is has better linguistic skills than us!

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  9. Of course your pet is a breed unknown to 99.9% of the rest of humanity. And of course he has a name that makes me smile before I even know who or what he or it is. And of course he’s bright as a polished penny and utterly adorable! Nice job!

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  10. I am finally back and I’m asking that you erase the first comment, Lottie if not too much trouble or you can leave it. I was in a huge hurry but wanted to get a few lines in about reading Colin’s story.He looks similiar to farm dogs that my dad and his dad always raised. We no longer have that strain of dogs after my dad became older. They all had that ratter instinct and looked kinda like a Colin. But they were cat friendly- probably because they were raised with cats and taught to only go after rats and mice.

    I love how you wrote the story and included some of the rescue sites. Also that you made note of the microchip. That is so important.

    Colin is looking better all the time and he will only improve with age. Just never allow him to think he is leader of the pack. If he had been raised with cats he might have been ok but those kinds of dogs have such a strong prey drive that anything that is small and furry is to be killed.That is the one draw back of the ratter dogs. But there are compensations for not being cat friendly so all in all it will balace out not having a cat.

    I hope you will keep writing a few lines here and there and include photos of him in future posts. He is so dang cute. xxxx ~yvonne

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    1. Have no fear, Colin will be featuring in many posts, if not in name, most certainly in the photos. You are right about the leader of the pack – now that he is more confident (overly so) I can see that he could fancy himself as top dog here and that would not be a good idea. Because he is so affectionate, he loves jumping up – i’m trying to discourage this as not everyone wants a dog in their face, or muddy paws all over the clothes – he’s much better now and is learning not to hurl himself at everybody when they come round or out on walks. He’s still young enough to train (the vet says that he is 3 years old) and being kind but firm and always consistent really helps. I’m convinced that he’s got a sense of humour, i know that i am biased and he is very smart, he doesn’t miss a trick. It’s a shame about the cats and i think you are right, if he’d grown up with them as a puppy he’d be much more wary and respectful. I wonder how he will deal with chickens when i get them?!XXXXX

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  11. Colin looks the little love, Lottie. Our dogs have always been welcomed on all the furniture, bed included. As far as the farting dog thing, Murphy sleeps under the covers and if the covers are pulled up to and not over the chin, well there is no problem. However, as the covers are pulled up but not over the chin, the resident canine below may have a problem with the alpha’s performance.. 😀
    Very much looking forward to more tales of Colin Snout and his people.

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    1. Blaming the farts on the canines has long been a trick of mine! sorry to be so slow replying to your comment Steve, my computer is playing up grrrrr! there is something wrong with the pad and the cursor keeps flying everywhere – just now it’s being perfect – fingers crossed. well, i can report that he slept on the bed the night before last and that since this post he’s been very poorly with gastroenteritis – he must have eaten something disgusting out in the olive groves so an expensive trip to the vet, several injections, special drinks and a prescribed diet and he is now on the mend. I am LOVING your new winter photographs – just incredible, you really are on a roll with these ones. I think they are very saleable – you need an agent!

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      1. You are hired, Agent Nevin. 🙂 In your spare time between caring for little Colin Snout and turning your home into a domestic castle you can promote artists. I believe you know with whom to start, although it appears he does quite well. 🙂
        The world must be a better place when we can take a sick pet to an actual hospital for care. I leave the vet feeling much better for Murphy’s well being and just as confused with the medicalese as when I leave my own doctor.
        And to, hopefully, close the subject… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjJc8xLYhak 🙂

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      2. This is perfect!! Knicker wettingly funny! I’ve not seen this one, Oh what a brilliant start to the day laughing my socks off. The drains are all blocked at the moment so after an ill Snout we now have a flooded bathroom and yard. laughter is a great tonic! I’m going to watch it again!! – THANKS for the laugh Steve 😉

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  12. What a sweet dog, he reminds me of Eddie in ‘Frasier ‘, I don’t know if you remember him. Does he keep mice away, or just eat the food so the mice have nothing to nibble? (I read the FB post about the thief) 😉 Nice addition to the family, sometimes having a dog helps you to forget about problems.

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    1. He is very sweet, George and we ADORE him. Rescue dogs have problems of their own and it takes time to address them. C. Snout cannot bear us being out of his sight – most of the time we are with him but on occasion we go out and then he goes beserk, something we are working on xxx

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    1. Colin says to tell Henry that he’s got the right idea. The more sleeping, eating and pooping you can do the better! especially when the sleeping is on the humans bed or best sofa, the food is off their plates and the poop is inside the house 😉

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  13. My friend in Germany has two rescue dogs from Spain. What is it about Spain and dogs?

    It is such a huge commitment to take on a rescue. You must be very tender-hearted. (I found you from Rodney’s blog. And my dear friends used to live in Andalucia and I like rioja, so I figure we have enough in common to warrant my following you).

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    1. Well Tracy, I’m absolutely delighted that you found me (via Rod) and thanks for now following my blog – I shall return the compliment. Mr Snout has had a very bad stomach, fortunately not the shits but being sick – he must have eaten something disgusting out in the campo and he’s been puking now for 4 days. I’d hoped that the trip to the vet would sort him out but he’s still not right. I have to confess that constantly mopping his sick of the floors is driving me steadily towards opening that bottle of Rioja Juice and downing it in one go!

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      1. Poor Mr Snout (or should I say poor you!) You’re brave. You’re also reminding me that I will never be the right person to adopt pets, no matter how cute and/or pleading their eyes might be.

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    1. Good grief! An Award!! Thank you, David, You are a darling for nominating me – I’m not sure what I’ve done to deserve it. Is it a huge award? Is it going to need a lot of polishing? Do I need to go out and buy a large bottle of Brasso? Many, many thanks for your kindness – Massive hugs, stuffed full of appreciation to you XXXXX

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  14. He’s adorable. Fantastic the way he suddenly decided you were the real deal and came out of his shell. I absolutely totally support the concept of rescue animals as pets – if and when we get a pet (where we live doesn’t lend itself well to it) it will be obtained from the SPCA. Sorry to see that young Colin hasn’t been well though, I hope he’s OK now.

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    1. He’s back to full health and bursting with energy – oh how I wish that I had half of his ‘get up and go’. Hope you do get a dog some day. For all the mess, muddy paws and responsibility, I’m so glad we have a snout back in our lives 😀 xxx

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    1. You are so up-to-date that you are scorchin’! I’ve got to confess something….I wrote this post about Colin Snout a few months back. I need to come clean on something…he sleeps on our bed every night now. Irishman relented, in fact he didn’t relent, he actually actively encouraged the dog up on to the bed with us. I’m not sure it’s such a good idea. What with the farting and licking and lying in such a way that I have to half hang out of the bed most of the night.

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  15. I was reading all your posts at the cemetary, yes I must get an award for finsihing them all off. Seems someone is falling in love with Colin Snout, and not a bad idea to have in bed in the winter!
    Got Dolly piece to nearly 4000 words now… editing past Dolly piece and hope to make it snapier! oh, i’m waiting for more posts, what’s next? hehe …glad ferry ride was boring ….a good book helps… after Indonesian ferries, it won’t be the same! ok, better get back to editing , you have a lovely day there !

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    1. and you too. The dog is by my side as I write this, Neither of us want to leave the comfort of the bed but there are things to do and adventures to be had. Looking forward to reading Dolly 😀

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    1. Marta, he’s the BEST! a total pain in the arse but wonderful nonetheless. He’s been with us almost a year now and despite all his filthy habits, makes this place really feel like home! xxx

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